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PHOENIX CHORALE
James K. Bass, conductor

1958 was the height of the Mid-Century Modern era and also the year the Phoenix Chorale was founded as the Bach and Madrigal Society. For centuries, choral music has incorporated the ideas, sounds, and texts of our modern lives. This program offers a glimpse into this practice with an interesting twist on ’Mid-Century Modern,’ featuring music by composers born in the middle of the 20th Century and music from the middle 19th Century. James K. Bass leads this program from Brahms’s O schöne Nacht to Paul Crabtree’s Romantic Miniatures from The Simpsons, and more, this concert displays how our tastes in musical styles have built upon the past and continue to shift to suit our modern selves.

OCTOBER 26, 2018 I 7:30 pm Friday – WEST VALLEY
American Lutheran Church I 17200 Del Webb Blvd., Sun City

OCTOBER 27, 2018 I 7:30 pm Saturday – CENTRAL PHOENIX
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral I 100 W. Roosevelt St., Phoenix

OCTOBER 28, 2018 I 3:00 pm Sunday – PARADISE VALLEY
Camelback Bible Church I 3900 E. Stanford Dr., Paradise Valley


For Mid-Century Modern, we welcome guest conductor and Search Finalist James K. Bass.Three-time Grammy-nominated artist James K. Bass is the Director of Choral Studies at the Herb Alpert School of Music at UCLA, Artistic Director of the Long Beach Camerata Singers in Long Beach, CA, and Associate Conductor for the Miami-based ensemble Seraphic Fire. As a conductor, James has prepared choirs for Sir David Willcocks, Michael Tilson-Thomas, Gerard Schwarz, and many others. He has appeared as soloist or ensemble artist with some of America’s most important choirs including Conspirare, Seraphic Fire, Santa Fe Desert Chorale, and Trinity Wall Street among others. Recently, James launched a new collaboration between UCLA and Seraphic Fire, an “Ensemble Artist Program,” designed to train the next generation of high-level ensemble singers as well as co-founding the Aspen Music Festival’s new Professional Choral Institute. Read James’s full bio >